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Offline Wilko

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Headder Pipes
« on: February 09, 2020, 02:26:47 PM »
Hello folks, Question.

WHAT exactly does the steel gauze do that is the end of the header pipes, that the silencer / muffler slides into.
As I have said previously, some of the "tangs at the end of my header pipe have corroded through and come off, now that the weather is picking up, I'm thinking of getting the pipe repaired, a new one is a stupid price.

So my question is, do I need the gauze, or can I just get a section added to the existing header, cut slots into it to form new tangs and fit the existing silencer / muffler into it, then clamp it all back up as before.

My previous bike, a Honda CBF1000 never had the gauze, just the two pipes slide together, and clamped, thoughts please.  :821:   
Paul Wilko

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Re: Headder Pipes
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2020, 05:21:10 PM »
Leaks in the exhaust system cause an increase in fuel consumption and pollutant gas emissions, as well as a decrease in engine performance.

For all this, when placing the mesh or seals as LOCTITE EA 3498 what we do is ensure its total tightness between its joints.
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Offline PhilInAthens

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Re: Headder Pipes
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2020, 10:27:43 PM »
I candidly do not know what the purpose of the steel gauze (steel mesh) is, but my experience with other engines is that sort of thing serves as a spark arestor.  That would be my guess - and it is a guess - but I'd make sure it was there just in case a "spark" could harm someting in the silencer (muffler).   

Offline Wilko

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Re: Headder Pipes
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2020, 08:37:03 PM »
Hi all.

Regards my header pipes, I have bought one, reportedly in excellent condition off Ebay, we will see, the bike is reported to have done 11000 miles, so fingers crossed.
The original one on my bike, I will have repaired, and probably sell on.
Paul Wilko

Offline 1675

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Re: Headder Pipes
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2020, 10:07:38 AM »
Just a word of caution here. I contacted Triumph about doing any welding on the bike and they advised against it as it could "spike" the ECU. They did say if any welding was done then all of the electronic components should be disconnected and even then, they still advised against it. If it gets to a time to do mine I will be removing it to carry out the repair (as Wilko is doing)

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Re: Headder Pipes
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 11:02:51 AM »
That's right, under no circumstances should electrical welding be done without first disconnecting the ECU, battery, etc.
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