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Offline Berber

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Disc pads
« on: August 13, 2013, 07:34:55 PM »
I have just had my 10k service and the rear disc pads were changed. It doesn't surprise me as I ride the back brakes when riding with Sarah on the back and when filtering (I do a LOT of filtering). I just thought I would make you aware as I thought the pads would have lasted longer. Oh, and I do trust the dealership and know they wouldn't have changed them for the sake of it.
'The farther one travels, the less one knows.......'

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Offline Chaos

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2013, 08:49:20 PM »
Robin

You certainly seam to be heavy on parts dude  :087: Try a lower gear when filtering and control on the throttle and cover the brakes  :028: Works a lot better for me  :028: Mind you 95% of my riding is without the use of my brakes  :005: Comes from 25 years on Harley's and with the brakes they had you had to learn how to use the engine more effectively.
Don't take this a dissing dude just give it a try it may work better for you :821: :821:

Chaos
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Offline w8d4it

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2013, 11:26:18 PM »
Unless you are racing, 10K on a set of brake pads is ridiculously short, whether front or back.  Did your dealer check to see if the pistons are sticking and/or uneven in the caliper bore.
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Offline Berber

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2013, 11:27:34 PM »
Cheers Chaos. I take it slowly when filtering but use the clutch, throttle and rear brake to keep the bike stable. I'll try it your way tomorrow.
'The farther one travels, the less one knows.......'

George Harrison

Offline Berber

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2013, 11:28:19 PM »
*Originally Posted by w8d4it [+]
Unless you are racing, 10K on a set of brake pads is ridiculously short, whether front or back.  Did your dealer check to see if the pistons are sticking and/or uneven in the caliper bore.

I don't know. I shall ask him next time we chat.
'The farther one travels, the less one knows.......'

George Harrison

Offline Trophy 59

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2013, 02:20:36 AM »
Thanks Berber, I ride same as you (although I have to filter far less). I use the back brake as a 'stabiliser' or drag as it tends to straighten out the bike when you are doing slow work like filtering. I'm only one third the journey to first service though, so still some time before the service.
Don't grow up, it's a trap...

Offline nert

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2013, 02:39:02 AM »
Ive been a rider since 1970. All kinds of brands and nationalities. Most of you in this thread are from overthere. Or, I am just not aware! What is filtering?

Offline Trophy 59

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Re: Disc pads
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2013, 02:45:58 AM »
No, mate, it's not drinking beer thru a moustache. :745:

Filtering is riding between lanes of near stationary gridlock traffic at peak traffic times, usually on motorways. The trick is to do it safely, not scare the cage drivers too much, and make some headway in your journey.  Tricky when you a judging gaps on a wide bike like the Trophy, especially with the rear panniers wide than the front fairing.

As opposed to lane splitting, which is more about coming to a stop between the first two cars at red traffic lights if you are on a multi lane road, then blasting away in front of the cars when the race starts (lights to green).
Don't grow up, it's a trap...

 



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