Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] Topic: Brake lever adjustment.  (Read 5394 times)

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  • Online digital   es

    • Trophy God  ‐    2610
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      #8

    Online digital

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    • Trophy SE 1200
    • Bike: digital
    • City / Town: Barcelona
    • Country: es
    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #8 on: May 31, 2020, 11.31 pm
    May 31, 2020, 11.31 pm
    For a moment I laughed a little, yes, because I was reading about lowering the footrests and I see his feet in the photo and I was wondering, but this man where up to where he has lowered the footrests since he has his feet on the ground.  :821:
    Only motorcyclists know why dogs stick their head out the car window.


  • Offline Canes1   us

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      #9

    Offline Canes1

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    • City / Town: Fayetteville, GA
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    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #9 on: May 31, 2020, 11.59 pm
    May 31, 2020, 11.59 pm
    Lol digital....didn't lower them that much! :008:

  • Offline aviseqdas   us

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      #10

    Offline aviseqdas

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    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #10 on: Nov 18, 2021, 02.45 pm
    Nov 18, 2021, 02.45 pm
    Old thread, but I am new to the forum and I just got the bike, still need to do a few things to make it to my liking. Coming froma sport bike, I feel the previous onwer just lowered the brake lever so much that I am finding it hard to engage the rear brakes fully, and  needless to say using the front causes the nose dive which I think is a disaster waiting to happen. I rather finish my stop with the rear so that I have a smooth stopping.

    So question, if I losen up the tie road, that should push the brake pedal a fit higher right?
    One of the Founding Members of the Twisted Trophies

  • Offline Coconut   gb

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    Offline Coconut

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    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #11 on: Nov 18, 2021, 05.42 pm
    Nov 18, 2021, 05.42 pm
    This Image gives the measurement of the Rear Brake Master Cylinder
    at it's standard / Factory Setting of 73.5mm, measured between the centre
    of the lower Master Cylinder mounting hole, and the centre of the push rod Clevis Pin hole :



    If you look at Canes1's Photo a few posts back on May 31 2020,
    you can tell that by adjusting the Push Rod to be LONGER it will RAISE the Brake Pedal,
    and SHORTENING the Push Rod will make the Brake Pedal Lower.

    After making the adjustment, check the operation of the Brake Light, and adjust the switch
    as necessary to ensure the Brake lIght comes ON when you press the Brake pedal :

    The "standard" gap between the upper face of the plastic locking / adjusting nut
    and the switch body should be approx. 4mm :



    I'm also interested in your comments about how you use the Brakes.

    The majority of Braking and reduction of speed is accomplished using the front brake,
    where weight is transferred to the front wheel resulting in the "Dive" you describe,
    but should be applied progressively so there is no "violent" diving going on !

    At SLOW / walking pace speeds, the front brake lever
    ( also know at low speeds as the "falling off" lever ! )
    should be used extremely cautiously, if at all,
    and very gently to reduce the risk of the front brake grabbing,
    especially if not perfectly upright, which could result in a fall.

    The Trophy is also equipped with "Linked Brakes" where a Proportional Control Valve
    transfers some of the braking force from the Rear Brake to the Front ( right ) brake,
    as weight is transferred to the front of the bike.

    Owners Handbook, Page 99 :

    This motorcycle is equipped with the Triumph Linked Brakes System,
    combined with the Anti-lock Brake System (ABS).

    In this system the rear brake is linked to the two lower pistons
    in the front right hand brake caliper.

    Operating the rear brake pedal will partially operate the front brake,
    allowing for balanced braking under all riding conditions.

    For full brake effectiveness always operate the front brake lever
    and the rear brake pedal simultaneously.

    Cheers  :821:



  • Offline aviseqdas   us

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    Offline aviseqdas

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    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #12 on: Nov 18, 2021, 05.47 pm
    Nov 18, 2021, 05.47 pm
    Wow thank you Coconut, I will adjust and let you know how it went, also the exhaust is going to be delivered today and DealerTool on Monday, cant wait to strip down the bike and do all the maintenance and adjustment required !!
    One of the Founding Members of the Twisted Trophies

  • Offline rpeters549   us

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      #13

    Offline rpeters549

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    Re: Brake lever adjustment.
    Reply #13 on: Nov 20, 2021, 05.41 pm
    Nov 20, 2021, 05.41 pm
    A small adjustment makes a pretty noticeable difference.  I had to do this when I installed my Knight lowered pegs.  Not bad, not hard.  I actually did it the PITA way with little dinky long wrenches, so to date I have adjusted and never ever removed that little cover panel.  It would have been so much easier though.

    One note about the discardability recommendation:  I agree with janfamilliar.  If it is a non-mechanical bolt/screw it will, and has always, been re-used.  Clean them and the hole good if you plan to use Loctite or have concerns of course.  While bolts do stretch, it takes a lot of torque to do so and I doubt the majority of those are torqued to those types of specs.  Not like the old Ford Cylinder head 'torque-to-yield' style bolts.
    Year round rider here!