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Offline DonTom

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Kill Switch
« on: June 08, 2014, 09:44:31 pm »
Warning! Dumb but related questions coming (BTW, IMO, all forums should have a dumb questions section, which will surely be my favorite section).

What is the purpose of a kill switch?

I mean, besides killing the engine.

The bike has a tilt switch, so if it falls over, engine dies, fuel pump stops pumping.

Ignition switch is easy to get to, not far from the kill switch and is best to be used.

I cannot think of a single reason to have a kill switch in the TTSE. It can cause trouble, but I don't think it can prevent any problem.

It can be turned on by accident, especially in the dark, killing the engine, with all those switches all over the bike. Could the bike be safer without such a switch?

Has anybody here ever used the kill switch for anything useful? Anybody here ever accidentally kill the engine with that switch?

I heard about the problem about the steering to the extreme left  breaking the wire to the kill switch.

Is there any reason why I should NOT bypass the kill switch, and make the switch do nothing at all in both positions?

I would like to hear some opinions on the usefulness of a kill switch when the bike already has a tilt switch.

-Don- Reno, NV
1971 Black BMW R75/5/* 1984 Red Yamaha Venture* 2002 Yellow Suzuki DR200SE* 2013 Blue Triumph Trophy SE*2016 Orange/Black Kaw Versy 650 LT*2016 Orange Moto Guzzi Stelvio* 2017 Gold/Black Harley FLTRU RoadGlide Ultra*2017 Zero 6.5DS* 2017 Zero SR13 w/Pwr Tank*2020 Energica SS9

Offline cropbiker

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2014, 10:29:03 pm »
Not a dumb question... Very thought provoking in fact! I agree, I can't think of a real reason to have one..

It's similar to the question why have a handbrake on an automatic car? The only time mine is ever applied is when they test it for the annual MOT!
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Offline atvtinker

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2014, 12:57:19 am »
Believe it or not, the manufacturers would rather you use the kill switch to shut off the bike first before turning off the ignition. It is also something that is taught in MSF courses. MSF courses tell you to use the kill switch if you need to kill the bike in an advertent movement of the bike because it is easier to use than trying to turn an ignition switch. Plus it keeps you from taking your hands off the handlebars to kill the bike. There are more reasons, but that is just some of the ones I remember.
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Offline DonTom

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2014, 05:55:36 am »
*Originally Posted by atvtinker [+]
Believe it or not, the manufacturers would rather you use the kill switch to shut off the bike first before turning off the ignition. It is also something that is taught in MSF courses. MSF courses tell you to use the kill switch if you need to kill the bike in an advertent movement of the bike because it is easier to use than trying to turn an ignition switch. Plus it keeps you from taking your hands off the handlebars to kill the bike. There are more reasons, but that is just some of the ones I remember.
TTSE owner's manual page 65:

"Engine Stop Switch"

"Ordinarily, only the ignition switch should be used to stop engine."


It says nothing about extraordinary.

Anyway, today I added my one inch spacers (Ace Hardware had everything required) with the 50 mm bolts. I also bypassed the kill switch inside of the cube. That gives those wires a couple of extra inches. I soldered the two wires together after I clipped them off and then used heat shrink tubing. All the way to the right stop is tight on the brake cable, but I don't consider that a problem.

I removed all the factory ties and used my own so there would be no pressure on the starter switch wires as well as no pressure on the opposite end. Cluch cable was no problem on mine.

As I had the switch cube apart, with the bike on the centerstand, I was considering bypassing the switch that turns on the cruise control, since most of us never turn it off.  But I decided to leave that as is, as I rarely use it anyway (I actually prefer my Throttlemeiser to a real cruise control).

After I got done working on the bike, I turned the steering to each stop at least 100 times, somewhat rough, to make sure all was fine. Then the bike started fine.

Then I went on a  test ride down  Red Rock Road here (and slowly chased a 3.5 foot long rattlesnake off the road during the ride <@2030 hrs here>). All is fine. I tested the cruise control and other stuff I worked near and all is working perfectly.

Now, I can more easily sit on the very rear of the seat. Other than that, I cannot say I noticed a real big difference in comfort, but the bike certainly feels different. My arms are long enough when it's stock. And I seem to never get tired on the TTSE. I have done a few 400 mile rides on it, even before adding these spacers.

I guess I will now leave my TTSE as it is, with no kill switch and the one inch spacers.

-Don-  Reno, NV





1971 Black BMW R75/5/* 1984 Red Yamaha Venture* 2002 Yellow Suzuki DR200SE* 2013 Blue Triumph Trophy SE*2016 Orange/Black Kaw Versy 650 LT*2016 Orange Moto Guzzi Stelvio* 2017 Gold/Black Harley FLTRU RoadGlide Ultra*2017 Zero 6.5DS* 2017 Zero SR13 w/Pwr Tank*2020 Energica SS9

Offline malcolm

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2014, 10:27:17 am »
I never use the kill switch I have seen rider kill the engine with the kill switch then walk away forgetting they have left the key in the bike, but unfortunately in the UK the kill switch has to work to pass an MOT (annual test of roadworthiness)

Offline rchollebon

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2014, 11:16:53 am »
I have never used a kill switch in 35 years of motorcycling,  I believe it is for emergencies only and as the Trophy has a tilt switch it seems superfluous, except in the UK it is a legal requirement.

Offline Ernest T

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2014, 02:44:45 pm »
You have to wonder why a motorcycle has to have a kill switch, but a car doesn't to pass your MOT.  We have a similar situation here with turn signals.  You don't have to have them to pass the safety inspection, but if you do have them, they must work.  Why?

Offline Ernest T

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Re: Kill Switch
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2014, 02:46:38 pm »
*Originally Posted by DonTom [+]
TTSE owner's manual page 65:

"Engine Stop Switch"

"Ordinarily, only the ignition switch should be used to stop engine."


It says nothing about extraordinary.

Anyway, today I added my one inch spacers (Ace Hardware had everything required) with the 50 mm bolts. I also bypassed the kill switch inside of the cube. That gives those wires a couple of extra inches. I soldered the two wires together after I clipped them off and then used heat shrink tubing. All the way to the right stop is tight on the brake cable, but I don't consider that a problem.

I removed all the factory ties and used my own so there would be no pressure on the starter switch wires as well as no pressure on the opposite end. Cluch cable was no problem on mine.

As I had the switch cube apart, with the bike on the centerstand, I was considering bypassing the switch that turns on the cruise control, since most of us never turn it off.  But I decided to leave that as is, as I rarely use it anyway (I actually prefer my Throttlemeiser to a real cruise control).

After I got done working on the bike, I turned the steering to each stop at least 100 times, somewhat rough, to make sure all was fine. Then the bike started fine.

Then I went on a  test ride down  Red Rock Road here (and slowly chased a 3.5 foot long rattlesnake off the road during the ride <@2030 hrs here>). All is fine. I tested the cruise control and other stuff I worked near and all is working perfectly.

Now, I can more easily sit on the very rear of the seat. Other than that, I cannot say I noticed a real big difference in comfort, but the bike certainly feels different. My arms are long enough when it's stock. And I seem to never get tired on the TTSE. I have done a few 400 mile rides on it, even before adding these spacers.

I guess I will now leave my TTSE as it is, with no kill switch and the one inch spacers.

-Don-  Reno, NV

I'm pretty comfortable with the riding position as is, especially since I can give my right hand a rest with the cruise control, but I'd like to have a little slack in the cables so I might do what you did anyway.

 



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