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Offline davidcumbria

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Clunky Gear change
« on: July 24, 2014, 09:32:39 PM »
UPDATE  PLEASE READ MY LATEST POST ON THIS SUBJECT 15 FEB 2015 IN CONJUNCTION WITH BELOW DISCUSSION

My may 2014 bike has now done 3500 miles and the clunking when changing gear has not really changed since first appearing after 200 miles from new. It is most pronounced on changing up from 2nd to 3rd at low acceleration and is there on all up changes except strangely 4th to 5th which is a perfectly normal click like on other bikes and how I assume the trophy box is meant to be. The noise is really quite atrocious a loud mechanical series of two or even three closely sequenced bangs as if the gearbox shafts or final drive is clashing about heavily in side it's housing. Clutchless gear changes and putting upward pressure on the elver before the change help but don't eliminate it. Some people say the box gets better after 5k but mine would have to be absolutely transformed to be acceptable and if anything it's getting worse. If you have ridden a harley or BMW k1300gt it's at least as bad as those. I had been hoping it was going to improve and when mentioned at the 500 mile service got 'they're all like that' but having spoken to other owners at the trophy vulcan meet they had no complaints so I cannot believe their gear changes are the same as mine. With the hot weather I ent for a nice gentle 40 -50 mph bimble and the crashing noise from the box simply spoiled the whole thing so I decided I had to do something  and rang triumph head office and spoke to warranty people.
Triumph west yorkshire are now going to have another test ride on it august 5th and see where we go from there. It is possible the bike will be going back to Hinkley. Will keep this thread updated.

It's very hard for people reading this to gauge whether I am being over sensitive or not. All I can say is I have owned 15 bikes or so over he last 4 years including several shafties, currently own 5, and the clunking is just too bad to be acceptable in comparison to all the others. Anyone else notice a significant difference in the 4/5th change compared with others ?
« Last Edit: February 15, 2015, 08:31:09 PM by davidcumbria »

Offline w8d4it

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2014, 09:48:52 PM »
I strongly suggest you change your oil.  10-50 full synthetic. See if that makes a difference.
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Offline malcolm

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2014, 10:18:45 PM »
Mine is the same if I try and ride slowly changing gear between 2.5- 4k rpm but if I ride it hard and change gear between 6-8k rpm it is perfect  :187: It also seems to be worse when hot riding in town. Like you say I get a double clunck once when I change gear and again when I let the clutch out no matter how slowly I feed the clutch in.

Offline azgman

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2014, 12:05:32 AM »
Go test ride a new Victory motorcycle. After that, everything seems quiet! I agree with the suggestion to get some known, good quality motorcycle oil in your bike.
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Offline trophied

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2014, 12:39:20 AM »
I notice it somewhat at lower RPM's, but it's not objectionable to me.  2 year warranty.  At any reasonable riding speed RPM's it's pretty slick and precise with full synthetic in it after the first service.  Go to your dealer and test ride a demo unit to see if yours is drastically different, and if it is ask them to note that in your vehicle history and e-mail it to you if you don't trust them so future issues can be addressed as a factory issue.  If you don't trust them or they won't do that, find another dealer quickly.
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Offline Wayneolson

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2014, 02:10:30 AM »
Just did the 500 mile service on my 2013, and it does the same. If you are shifting at lower rpms, clunkety clunk. I personally think the switching is fine. I just can't wait to be able to do more "spirited" driving. At higher rpms, seems like butter to me.
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Offline 1150newguy

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2014, 03:27:17 AM »
I came from a Beemer so I understand what you are saying. Mine has 8000 miles on it and it is getting better. Still clunks pretty good around town at lower speeds, but is much smoother and quieter when I can get the revs up a bit.

Offline nert

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Re: Clunky Gear change
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2014, 04:18:48 AM »
Keep the revs up between shifts. Shifting in the basement at 3k as opposed to 4-5k makes a HUGE difference.
Also, rather than pulling the clutch in like normal, pull your clutch lever just a 1/4" or 3/8" only and keep your revs higher ready for the next gear. It will be much better and smoother. Its a little different technique that riding a Harley or International Harvester with 4 on the floor. Learn the bike. Don't expect the bike to learn you. Adapt, become a skillful rider.

 


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