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Offline PhilInAthens

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TPMS Calibration
« on: January 31, 2015, 04:55:35 pm »
I used the forum search to see what I could find on this, but couldn't find my needed answer.  To explain, I have some fairly good gauges all of which pretty closely match when measuring tire pressures on the bike.  However, the TPMS reading is easily 5-6 psi higher on both tires. Is there a way for the owner to calibrate the TPMS to match gauge readings? Thanks.  :821:

Offline janfmiller

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2015, 06:23:54 pm »
I find my TPMS read about 2 pounds higher than 'real'.   Are you checking immediately when cold, I was surprised at how fast the tires heat up and pressure rises, especially the front....
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Offline Coconut

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2015, 06:26:52 pm »
There's no way for the Owner to calibrate Tyre Pressure Sensors that I've heard of.

Best thing would be to visit a friendly Triumph Dealer and ask
whether their Diagnostic equipment can calibrate the sensors or not,
then let us all know what they say !

Of course tyre pressures should be set when the tyre is cold,
and you would use a known accurate tyre pressure gauge to do that,
not the TPMS system, which doesn't activate until the wheel starts turning.

I find the Sensors are best for alerting if there is a serious loss of pressure whiel riding,
so you can stop and investigate, rather than for using them to see what the actual pressure is.

Cheers  :821:


Offline towersk

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2015, 07:34:30 pm »
Check out this thread: https://www.triumph-trophy.com/index.php/topic,3303.msg42906.html#msg42906

Also check your private messages.
Cheers,
Ken

Offline PhilInAthens

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2015, 03:08:47 pm »
Thanks Coconut!  And, thank you for your offer, Towersk!  I have a dealer visit in my future for the audio module patch, so will ask them to check things then.  Meanwhile, I'll spend less time fretting readings and more time enjoying the ride.   :821:

Offline Saaz

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2015, 03:47:51 am »
I found that the TPMS was accurate, it was two gauges I was using that were over reading. But there seems to be a little variation around.

Offline blizzard

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2015, 02:48:06 pm »
I received the low tyre pressure alarms after having work done on 3 occasions, each needed to be recalibrated by the dealer to resolve. I think they finally brought in a laptop from home to get it to stick.

Offline sin_tiger

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Re: TPMS Calibration
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2015, 08:25:23 pm »
From my experience with sensors (non bike) I would say that it's not the sensors that are calibrated, rather the display instrument.

A sensor will normally send an output in either digital (on or off) or in this case analogue I.e. a range of readings, the instrument, the dash display in this case, is then programmed or "calibrated" If you like,  to known points,  normally 0 and the full scale capability of the sensor, 100 psi in this case. Additionally if there is a variance across this range that is outside the design tolerances an interpolation curve will also be programmed info the instrument and algorithms for temperature compensation (same principle applies to the temp signal). The pressure displayed on the instrument is a calculation the instrument displays based on an value sent from the sensor, hence the reason the displays can be switched from psi to bar, kpa etc.

In short, the sensor see's a pressure, it doesn't know or care what that pressure is and sends an XYZ signal to the receiving end which uses that value to calculate and display what you want to see. So, the "calibration" is done at the instrument end rather than the sensor end, there's usually nothing that can be done with sensors, even changing a battery will affect the sensor which is why manufacturers epoxy them in place. All you can do is test them against a standard and reuse or bin them.

+- 2 psi, i.e. 2% variance is a very acceptable figure for this type of sensor, don't forget that the hand held gauge also has an accuracy (that includes digital gauges) and lastly of course how you read the hand held in the case of an analogue gauge. So if you get within 4 psi of the display and a hand gauge you're doing well. The important thing is to monitor the trend if you have concerns, does it increase by 2-3 psi after a couple of miles and perhaps 2 psi more at highway speeds, then return at restricted speeds and is it consistent.

Sorry about all the edits, the phone is not the best device for longer responses.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2015, 09:08:07 pm by sin_tiger »