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Offline davidcumbria

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HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« on: July 27, 2015, 10:28:56 pm »
The Air filter should be replaced every 10k under the service schedule. To do so means removing the all the bodywork and the fuel tank which significantly adds to the cost of the service. I bought a filter for £30  and being time rich and mean decided to do it myself providing the dealer could confirm that the throttle sync was ok which would be another reason to strip it all down (it was and 10k service still cost £220 with 2.2 h labour).

I had also been of the view that it might be unnecessary to change the filter every 10k especially since 95% of my riding is in the countryside. I delayed doing the change until 12k because I didn't want to pull the bike to bits immediately before a 2.5K european tour.

Below is a photo of the old and new filter - every 10k seems a lot more reasonable now!



Having done the job without any significant problems I would do it again and it would be so much easier next time having experienced and overcome the niggling difficulties that go with it.

Here are pictures of the bike stripped down without the fuel tank and the monster fuel tank itself. Seeing the tank off the bike shows how Triumph tried as best they could to use available space and lower the Cof G but the bike design is hamstrung by the tall engine.







1. First job is to take off all the body work. This is very adequately covered in Coconuts thread in this section re R&G crash bars. All I would add is that access to the tricky scrivets at the lower fairings joint is much improved if you remove the triangular exhaust cover before trying to push them out - easier from above )

2.Disconnect and remove the battery and optimate lead. You do not need unscrew the battery tray since this comes out with the fuel tank as you can see above from the tank photo. Remove the negative terminal connection first. You also need to move the negative lead to the outside of a circular clip on the inboard side of the battery tray so it doesn't hold up the tank /tray when you remove them.
here shown before unclipping lead.



3. The solenoid in front of the battery tray is held in place by by a rubber boot which slides onto two  fingers on the front side of the tray. You don't need to disconnect the wires just prise the solenoid forward off the fingers using a screw driver. If it fouls this can be left until  when you later remove the tank backwards. photograph shows the solenoid and battery tray lugs prior to reinstallation.( after thought - it is a real pain to get the solenoid back onto the fingers even with the tank loose. It may be easier to remove the battery tray and leave the solenoid in place. The service manual suggest the way I did it but provided that  refitting the lower tray mounting bolts isnt too much of a pain it might be a an easier reassembly process).



4.Again to avoid fouling on removal the upper bodywork support in front of the tank needs to removed by unscrewing the 4 screws. Take care by using a magnetic probe or pliers not to drop the rear two when loose as access  is too limited to easily lift them out with fingers.



5. Pull the breather  hose and overflow hose off their connectors under the filler cap and out of their channels on either side of the tank. Make sure you remember which is which but they do remain attached to the bike  so not too difficult.





6.Remove the front seat bridge and fuel tank support brackets. Total 8 10mm nuts. Dont try to remove as single unit or you may damage the stud threads.



7. On left side of tank just to rear of support bracket is fuel level sender electrical connection. Photos below should assist in figuring out how it comes apart.






8. Now ready to drain tank. Obviously best if you can start the job with a near empty tank but I drained half a tank full into a jerry can without problems so not a big deal. Get your funnel and receptacle set up in position - you may need a stool or something- before you start as it can take a while. There are 4 compartments that each need to drain, 2 on each side. The compartments on each side  are linked by a pipe with a junction you can pull apart ( photo) and if you clamp one side of the junction first then you have only one pipe draining to collect. I used a mini G clamp and also tried a set of mini mole grips. A pair of electrical pliers with a decent jaw breadth makes easy work of gripping the wire hose clamp and sliding it away from the union. The pipes then seperate quite easily after a twist to break the seal.





9. Once the tank has drained you can move the connector pipes outboard of the frame  and recconect the joint to avoid remnant fuel finding its way out. Note carefully the routing of the pipes and their guide clips for reassembly. The front left hand hose passes through a loop on the harness.

10. Remove the two tank mounting bolts 12mm . photo shows rhs bolt on lower edge of tank



11. The tank can now be rotated/ lifted without removing  and the back end can rest on the small compartment under the seat. This allows you access to the fuel pump electrical connector and hose connections under the tank.



12. Until you work out what to do separating the electrical connector is a puzzle. You have to stick a small blade into the claw  from below the connector to release it. hopefully the photos make it clear how it works.The fuel connector is only 15nm tight so comes out easily with the limited access using  spanner.



14. The fuel tank can now be removed upwards and backwards. Just keep an eye on the front end to make sure none of the wires and connectors get snagged. Hoorah !

15. The airfilter is fitted into a carrier and the whole lot comes out when 5 torx screws T20 are removed. There may be some bits of dust and sand up wind of the filter in the airbox so a vacuum can be used to get it all squeaky clean.






Reassembly Tips

A bit of rubber grease helps the reassembled filter / carrier slide in smoothly. There are guide slots for the carrier but it took me a few tries before it popped down the last few mm and the holes lined up again. Dont be tempted to put the screws until you are sure it has located properly.

Biggest problem by far was getting the starter solenoid back onto its tangs. Do this straight away while the tank still movable after fitting just the fuel feed and electrical connector underneath and before all the rest of the reinstallation. Make sure the spade connectors on the solenoid are fully pressed on when you are finished as they have been known to fall off and leave you stranded.They also help to secure the hemispherical rubber boots over the two large connectors on the solenoid which otherwise leaves them exposed.

Check that you haven't trapped the breather pipes under the tank when trying to refit.

Dont forget the fuel tank sender connection. Not much free wire here so best done last after all the moving around of the tank has been done.

The main long fixing bolts are unlikely to be aligned with their threaded socket so they do slide backwards and forwards and a bit of peering down the hole to check alignment is necessary.

As soon as I  had all the tank and battery connections remade I put a few litres of fuel in and tried the engine. Dont want to find something wrong when all the body work back on!

Time consuming job but ultimately quite easy. Satisfying to see your bike innards and DIY.   :002:


Offline Travelling2bob

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2015, 02:28:35 am »
Outstanding How to Dave, well done. It's a big job that I've only experience once helping Queensland Ken a while back.
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Offline atrophy

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2015, 03:07:46 am »
Well done, Thank you!!!
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Offline DonTom

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2015, 03:51:14 am »
*Originally Posted by davidcumbria [+]
The Air filter should be replaced every 10k under the service schedule.
IMO, at what mileage an air filter should be replaced should be decided by where the bike has been mostly used. I doubt if my air filter has a drop of dust and I am just a few hundred miles away from the 10K mark.

I will probably wait until the 20K service and do it all then, including the air filter, if it then needs it or not.

But I really appreciate you taking to time to post what you did and all the effort you put into doing such.

BTW, was it easy as a one-man job? Everything such as the empty  fuel tank light enough to easily handle?

I bookmarked your post  and will use it for my 20K service. But I refuse to tear my  bike apart just to find an  air filter that still looks like new.

Others, such as those who live several miles down an unpaved road (very common here in NV), should then change it every 3000 miles or less. If I lived in such a place, I would be checking to see how much trouble it is to change the air filter before buying the bike, regardless of any recommendation of only miles in a owner's manual.   How does Triumph know where we have been riding? Or do Triumph engineers  think all riding places are equal with amount of dust?

I would never decide by mileage alone of when to replace an air filter.

-Don-  Reno, NV
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Offline triumphwes

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2015, 04:13:30 am »
David,

You're awesome, thanks for adding to the collective! :152:
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Offline davidcumbria

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2015, 07:48:19 am »
*Originally Posted by DonTom [+]
IMO, at what mileage an air filter should be replaced should be decided by where the bike has been mostly used. I doubt if my air filter has a drop of dust and I am just a few hundred miles away from the 10K mark.

BTW, was it easy as a one-man job? Everything such as the empty  fuel tank light enough to easily handle?


-Don-  Reno, NV

thanks for the kind comments everyone. Writing this up and thinking about the photos was an enjoyable challenge and my first effort at such a thing. I would encourage anyone to give it a try yourself sometime.

Yes I did it as a one man job though a second pair of hands would be helpful to lift the tank for unfastening the fuel pump connections but this can be got round. Empty tank not heavy at all.
 I agree about not being too regimented on air filter mile ages but as my first picture shows even with un polluted country air for  all but a couple hundred miles in my 12k the filter picked up a lot more dirt than I was expecting. Be interesting to see if I notice any change in performance or fuel consumption.

Offline Saaz

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2015, 09:36:37 am »
 Fantastic guide. Will be invaluable first time I get in that far, I have done the R&G bars bit so far

Offline DonTom

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2015, 11:14:01 am »
*Originally Posted by davidcumbria [+]
thanks for the kind comments everyone. Writing this up and thinking about the photos was an enjoyable challenge and my first effort at such a thing. I would encourage anyone to give it a try yourself sometime.

Yes I did it as a one man job though a second pair of hands would be helpful to lift the tank for unfastening the fuel pump connections but this can be got round. Empty tank not heavy at all.
 I agree about not being too regimented on air filter mile ages but as my first picture shows even with un polluted country air for  all but a couple hundred miles in my 12k the filter picked up a lot more dirt than I was expecting. Be interesting to see if I notice any change in performance or fuel consumption.
I doubt you will notice any difference at all. Even your air filter looks like it could have easily made it to 20K. It doesn't look that bad to me.

-Don-  SSF, CA
« Last Edit: November 11, 2015, 09:39:46 am by DonTom »
1971 Black BMW R75/5/* 1984 Red Yamaha Venture* 2002 Yellow Suzuki DR200SE* 2013 Blue Triumph Trophy SE*2016 Orange/Black Kaw Versy 650 LT*2016 Orange Moto Guzzi Stelvio* 2017 Gold/Black Harley FLTRU RoadGlide Ultra*2017 Zero 6.5DS* 2017 Zero SR13 w/Pwr Tank*2020 Energica SS9

 



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