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Online earthman

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #48 on: August 17, 2018, 10:35:51 PM »
Anybody thought of putting some kind of quick release fuel connector on that fuel line? I really don't like the fact that you have to unscrew that banjo bolt and mess around with replacing washers,.....I reused mine but how many times can you get away with that before they leak I'm wondering??

Offline AZBob

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #49 on: August 22, 2018, 12:15:17 AM »
*Originally Posted by earthman [+]
Anybody thought of putting some kind of quick release fuel connector on that fuel line? I really don't like the fact that you have to unscrew that banjo bolt and mess around with replacing washers,.....I reused mine but how many times can you get away with that before they leak I'm wondering??

I've only taken the tank off two bikes, and this one was by far easier than the other. The other bike had a quick-connect, but due to it being a fuel line, you needed a pair of pliers to deal with it. And they couldn't be made of metal because sparks/explosions/etc.
2014 Triumph Trophy 1200 SE
2013 Honda CB1100

Online earthman

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #50 on: August 22, 2018, 07:41:10 AM »
I noticed the plastic connector on the other end of the pipe funny enough, I did think why doesn't the manual say to disconnect the tank there?
I'm assuming that it's not 'welded' but I didn't force anything just in case it broke in my hand.

Offline RocketSteve

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #51 on: August 22, 2018, 03:46:45 PM »
I have an 8mm Fuel Line Quick Coupler that I'm putting in - the next time I'm under there...

Common part No: FLCP08
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Online earthman

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #52 on: August 22, 2018, 08:12:18 PM »
*Originally Posted by RocketSteve [+]
I have an 8mm Fuel Line Quick Coupler that I'm putting in - the next time I'm under there...

Common part No: FLCP08

Thanks Steve,....you'll probably get around to fitting one sooner than me, let us know how you get on. :002:


Offline SpeedTwinPilot

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2019, 08:49:18 AM »
"Yes I did it as a one man job though a second pair of hands would be helpful to lift the tank for unfastening the fuel pump connections but this can be got round. Empty tank not heavy at all."
 
A piece of wood that fits the gap between the tank and the structure can be used to make some working space and also free both hands.

On pre '96 models the filter can only be removed by first removing the complete carburetor block. First remove the mid airduct sections left and right (2 bolts and push/pull fitting on breatherpipes, so no need to cut the tie-raps), slacken the clamps aft of the carbs then slide back the filterbox, drain the carbs by loosening the lower sideways projected screws, remove the choke cable, slacken front clamps (carburetor side only), then slide sideways the carb block to the right with a rocking motion to carefully free it from and manoeuvre it along the rubber joints. After that the box can be removed to unscrew it for replacing the filter.
The carb block can be detached from the throttle cable to put aside.

And yes, first the tank needs to be removed as well! Drain first on 'PRI', unscrew the 6 bolts holding the holdingbracket to the frame, put that piece of wood underneath, pull off the vacuum- and 2 petrol pipes, carefully slide back and up the tank. As you have done that, you might as well remove the fuel cock and drain the complete contents of the tank. You might be surprised what comes out of the unused trapped space on the right side of the tank! Could be easily 1/2 liter of water!

Now the carbs are alongside the bike as well, it might be the moment to inspect the bowls as well. Having drained the bowls pre removing the lot, you can turn over the carbs (carefully for there might be some fuel in the hoses left) and place it on a wooden underground (table, plank) to not damage the top covers. Then remove the two screws per bowl (use a good fit screwdriver!) and you will see some accumulation of dirt in the lowest point near the drain screw. Best thing to do this with carbs that are drained well and left some time to dry out from petrol, since the dirt then does not flow back into the carb when flipping over upside down.

Offline Coconut

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2019, 02:02:27 PM »
The below comments ( from SpeedTwinPilot ) relate to the previous Trophy Model,
not the latest Model which does not have carburettors !

« Last Edit: March 27, 2019, 07:54:49 AM by Coconut »
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Offline Mr.Goodwill

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Re: HOW TO : Remove Fuel Tank and Change Air Filter
« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2019, 06:30:04 PM »
Fantastic instruction !  :047:  . Thank you for your contribution. I did it your way. This is my first bike with such a stupid air filter arrangement. Serviceable parts should be easy accessible. Triumph engineers  :151: :151: :151:
Vivamus, Moriendum Est (Latin) – ‘Let us live, since we must die.’

 


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