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Offline Lesco

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Low speed manovering
« on: August 23, 2015, 12:25:22 pm »
Guys can anyone help me please, I am having terrible trouble with my low speed maneuvering on this new Trophy of mine, I just cant seem to get it right, is anyone else having problems??

I've been riding bikes over 30 odd years now but for some reason all my confidence has gone, you would not believe I've ever ridden a bike before the way I do my right hand turns at low speeds, I have in all honesty put a lot of weight on over the years and am over 20 odd stone now in weight now and Im wondering if that is the problem, I try to snap my head around to do the turn and get the bike where Im looking but I cant seem to do this properly anymore.

I absolutely love the Trophy and its the best bike by a long way I've ever owned so this little glitch is spoiling my enjoyment.

thanks in advance for any help and advice, and if you think it is my weight please be brutally frank with me I wont be offended..............
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Offline Zebraranger

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2015, 01:12:31 pm »
Don't beat yourself up too hard, the Trophy is extremely top heavy, as many here have noted. With the engine high up in the frame, battery high up on the bike and large fuel tank up high, it makes it much more top heavy than any other bike I've ever owned, including a Goldwing 1800. I too have been riding 30 plus years and found that it jut takes practice and getting use to its top heavy characteristics. Even now, while doing walking speed maneuvers, takes me paying more attention to what I'm doing to prevent a oops or bobble. Most of my previous bikes were pretty normal and routine doing slow speed maneuver's, but this Trophy takes paying special attention.

Offline azgman

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2015, 01:29:02 pm »
You need to refresh your knowledge by reading an article on slow speed riding and then practice in a controlled environment, like a parking lot. It will come back to you. That said, developing stronger core muscles will help as well, so exercise is the key there. Added benefit is that the girls will be swooning over your new body!  :821:

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Offline neojynx

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 02:15:29 pm »
I had an horrendous time when I bought the Trophy.  Couldn't go around a roundabout without feeling that I was going to fall off.  Now I can swing the thing around pretty well.  Still am really careful in very slow speed situations and almost 'lost it' only yesterday as I put my foot down on a gravel surface.

Give it some time and some practice- and remember the front brake lever isn't called the 'falling off lever' for no reason.

regards

Garry








« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 02:19:26 pm by neojynx »
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Offline atrophy

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2015, 03:23:22 pm »
*Originally Posted by azgman [+]
You need to refresh your knowledge by reading an article on slow speed riding and then practice in a controlled environment, like a parking lot. It will come back to you. That said, developing stronger core muscles will help as well, so exercise is the key there. Added benefit is that the girls will be swooning over your new body!  :821:

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Excellent article.   Lesco, you mentioned lack of confidence, that makes a huge difference.  I would suggest you read the above article and practice in an empty parking lot.  Maybe with a fellow rider watching.  Get your confidence and skills back and you will be good to go.
Good luck.
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Offline NOLA

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2015, 03:24:51 pm »
A friend, who is a Motorcycle Officer, gave me three pieces of advice about low speed turning when I started riding that has helped me out tremendously. 1) Look where you want to go, not where the bike is pointed, 2) learn the sweet spot between clutch and throttle and 3) gently cover the rear brake.  I have applied these three principles to riding the TTSE and it has worked great for me.  Don't get me wrong, The TTSE is a big, heavy bike and I still get a little apprehensive at times but I find I can better manage it now.  Confidence is key when handling this beast!       

Offline triumphwes

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2015, 03:40:39 pm »
NOLA is giving some really good advice.  If you look at the ground, that's where you'll go.  Learn the friction zone of your clutch, and rear brake.  I too coming from a long line of Harleys took some parking lot time to acquire those sweet spots and was doing near full lock turns within a short time.

Do remember the brakes are linked.  From what I gather, and anyone with further knowledge please add or correct me, the rear master cylinder is kind of like a two stage. It first activates the rear caliper, then the front pads on the front caliper...  My message is don't "stomp" on the rear brake pedal while practicing...
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Offline Volfy

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Re: Low speed manovering
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2015, 03:50:02 pm »
I sold my C14 for pretty much the same reason.  And swore off 700 lbs bikes for quite a while.  I've since learned that it is more technique than brute force or raw talent.  For both high speed and low speed, you have more control of the bike when you are either on the throttle or on the brake.  For low speed, learn to apply rear brake while feeding some throttle, once you get the hang of balancing between the two, you will feel much more in control of the bike in parking lot maneuvers than if you simply coast and feather in the throttle occasionally to keep from falling over.

Tare off all the bags and find an empty parking lot.  Practice doing the figure 8.  Start wide and fast where you're comfortable, then try tightening the circle and slowing down.  Apply rear brake as you do this.  To turn tight, you also need to lean the bike into the turn.  Unlike turning at speed, you won't have centrifugal force to balance out the gravitational force at lean.  So... you have to slide your weight to the outside.  This is exactly the opposite of what you do at the track dragging knees, but exact same principle applies.  If you have never move you body off center line, you can practice by doing this at regular speed.  Slide you butt cheek off to one side, while keeping the bike in a straight heading.  You will find the bike will naturally lean the opposite way to balance with you.  The more you slide you butt over, the more the bike leans.

Once you combine this technique with the rear brake, you have everything you need to do what those police bike competition guys do.  I know, I have a Leo as a neighbor.  I haven't gotten to the point where I can figure 8 inside of 4 parking spaces, but I am much more confident now than my C14 days.
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