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Offline speedydeano

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rear brake light
« on: September 22, 2015, 06:03:43 pm »
hi guys
have just had my brand new (ye ha ) trophy delivered today and am looking for suggestions as i have a little problem
I have the engine running and apply the front brake the brake light comes on yet when I apply the foot brake I get nothing
any ideas
am going to speak to dealer tomorrow
cheers

Offline cropbiker

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2015, 08:15:46 pm »
I would imagine it is as simple as the microswitch needing adjustment...

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Offline speedydeano

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2015, 08:25:57 pm »
cheers cropbiker
ive got to say they have been first class so far when we went in it was so different than buying a car they were totally spot on in the sales and parts would highly recommend anyone that wants a triumph to go there

Offline dsinned

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2015, 11:39:33 pm »
Mine was not actuating the rear brake light either.  I had to really press hard with my right foot on brake pedal to get the stop light to turn on, so I had a go at adjusting the rear brake light actuator switch myself.  Just need a 12mm wrench to do it at the rear of the brake pedal where the brake light plunger assembly is located.  A couple of clockwise (or was it counterclockwise?) turns on the plunger bolt with your fingers is all it took to dial it in. 

First, loosen a 12mm keeper nut near the bottom of the plunger bolt where it is tight up against a craddle to keep the plunger locked in place.   Rotate the nut about 3/8" up against a smaller 10mm nut at the top of the same bolt.  This is where the plunger goes inside a rubber boot to actuate the brake light switch.  Now, tighten that 12mm nut up against the 10mm nut on the opposite (top) end plunger.  You can now turn the plunger bolt with your fingers up or down as necessary to adjust the point at which the brake light switch actuates. 

With the ignition on, test the brake pedal by pulling it down slightly to the point where the light turns on.  Make sure there is still some free play just before the light comes on.   When, you find the sweet spot, rotate the 12mm keeper nut back down the other direction toward the bottom of the bolt and tighten it up against the plunger bolt craddle.  Recheck the adjustment has been properly made and your done. 

Just don't over do the adjustment travel range or the brake light will be too easily turned on by just barely resting your foot on the pedal.  Too much downward pressure without realizing it, aka "riding the brake", will keep the light on all the time.  To prevent this from occurring, you want to maintain just enough free play under opposing spring tension of the pedal so it can rebound on its own.  The sweet spot is when the light comes on just when the free play in the pedal is taken up almost all the way, while lightly pressing down on the pedal with your foot, but not so hard that the brake is actually applied. 

Btw, no other parts of the bike in the vicinity of the brake pedal need to come off to make this adjustment.   :062:
« Last Edit: September 23, 2015, 12:21:58 am by dsinned »
Original owner of 2014 Lunar Silver Trophy SE, and 2015 Custom Silver & Black Bonneville T100.

Offline w8d4it

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2015, 02:34:05 am »
I also have to apply determined pressure to get the rear brake light to activate but I just figured that was Triumph's was of dealing with those riders who may have a tendency to ride the brake as you mention.  I may give the adjustment a try although I can't say I've ever had anyone mention my brake fails to light when I stop. 
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Offline Older traveler

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2015, 11:56:20 am »
Anybody else remember when dealer prep meant something? I have an excellent Triumph dealer now for service and sales but it was no easy task to find him. I especially like that he is a Triumph ONLY dealer.

Offline DaMonk45

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2015, 03:05:49 pm »
I am wondering, but are bikes not inspected before delivery?

If they are how did this pass?

Offline dsinned

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Re: rear brake light
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2015, 05:34:39 pm »
Here in CA motorcycle dealers make a lot of profit by charging inflated "setup fees".  Same for automobile dealerships. 

A new motorcycle (or car) setup fee can be as much as several hundred dollars.  The actual amount can really be as much as whatever they want to charge.  In rare cases, a few dealers may waive this fee, but most will not unless it is to make a used bike sale.  Sometimes "freight" is included in the setup fee, so the total cost of both can be closer to a $1000.   I'm sure the portion for the freight charge is inflated as well.

What does a typical "setup" charge entail?  Basically, uncrating a new bike from the shipper, topping off the fluids, checking tire pressures, and connecting the battery; 60 minutes tops! 

This usually includes what is referred to as the "PDI" (Pre Delivery Inspection); with a detailed checklist of final inspection and adjustment requirements prior to delivery to the customer.  If ALL those checklist requirements were done properly, the PDI would take  the average service tech a couple of hours, especially if the fairing must be removed to do certain inspections.  The service fee should be charged at the shop's standard labor rate, which may vary from $75 to $150 per hour.  Again, there is a lot of profit margin in the service business based on the labor rate and "esitmated" time for the service work itself. 

In reality, it probably takes only 15 to 30 minutes, including the time it takes for a test ride and topping off the fuel tank.  Of course, the actually time it takes for the PDI is never documented, so this equates to an astronomical labor rate of three or four times the shop's standard, greatly adding to the dealer's profits.

Unfortunately, "little things" like topping off the tank and testing for proper operation of the brakes and stop light are often overlooked, but the advertised setup charge still stays the same, and the dealer may get paid AGAIN for a subsequent warranty claim for just doing a minor adjustment.   :007:
« Last Edit: September 23, 2015, 05:40:02 pm by dsinned »
Original owner of 2014 Lunar Silver Trophy SE, and 2015 Custom Silver & Black Bonneville T100.