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Offline Blazer

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front brake pads
« on: February 28, 2016, 01:53:57 pm »
Any chance of someone giving a quick run-through of changing these

Offline Coconut

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Re: front brake pads
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2016, 02:58:49 pm »
First of all, consider your own mechanical skills and abilities
alongside the critical nature of an efficient braking system,
and the comparatively low cost of having this task performed by a Dealer
  :169:

Have a look here : Rotate front brake pads? - There's an exploded drawing at Reply #13.

If one pad is worn down to the central wear line ( Service limit thickness = 1.5mm )
then all 8 pads ( 4 per caliper ) should be changed.

On each caliper remove ( unscrew ) the upper and lower Brake Pad retaining pins,
which will also release the anti-rattle spring,
(note how it fits so you know how it goes back in ),
then simply withdraw the old Brake Pads.
( Retaining pins should be tightened to 18Nm wwhen replaced ).

"Usual" things to consider when changing any Brake pads :
  • You may need to ( Carefully ) push the Caliper Pistons back in slightly to remove the old pads,
  • You will usually need to push the Caliper Pistons back even more to insert the new "fatter" pads,
  • Be mindful that any rust etc on the extended pistons coulld damage the piston seals
    when they are pushed back in, so should be cleaned off before doing so.
  • Be mindful of the risk of folding back Piston or Master Cylinder seals when pushing pistons into calipers,
  • Be mindful of causing Brake Fluid to leak out of the Master Cylinder when pushing pistons into calipers
  • Ensure that Brake Fluid is not spilt onto any painted surfaces,
  • New pads will not achieve full efficiency until "bedded in" which can take around 200 miles
Additionally for the Trophy - with a linked Braking system,
note that is not possible to bleed the system fully without additional equipment to open the ABS valves.





Offline cropbiker

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Re: front brake pads
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2016, 03:11:58 pm »
I don't know about God hood Coconut but you should certainly be nominated for saint hood!!!
Triumph Trophy! Not for every Tomaz, Dieter or Herman!🇬🇧

Offline Blazer

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Re: front brake pads
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2016, 04:09:00 pm »
Cheers Coconut, much appreciated

Offline Iain

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Re: front brake pads
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2016, 10:54:56 am »
Coconut,
Is that a job for the Triumph dealer only or should any bike mechanic be able to do it?
Honda VFR 2002
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Sprint GT 2011
Trophy SE 2013

Offline Coconut

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Re: front brake pads
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2016, 11:50:26 am »
Changing Brake pads is a "relatively" easy job - IF you know what you are doing !

Any "reputable" or "competent" motorcycle mechanic should have no problem.

It doesn't have to be done by a Triumph Dealer, no special tools are required.

HOWEVER - to Properly Bleed the system ( which may or may not be needed ),
Special equipment IS needed - to open the valves within the ABS system.

The benefit of using a Triumph Dealer is that they will usually plug the bike
into their Diagnostics computer ( which has the Brake Bleeding stuff on it ),
and will also check for any Software downloads / updates as well as checking
for any "DTC" codes. ( Diagnostic Trouble Codes / Faut Codes ).

Personally I'd use a Triumph Dealer  :028: