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Offline Bludy L

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Stayin' Safe
« on: May 16, 2016, 10:30:03 pm »
I'm not sure if this is the right part of the forum for this, but what the heck.

Last weekend I did one of the Stayin' Safe Tours. http://www.stayinsafe.com/. I did the Southeastern Ohio tour. It was extremely useful and lots of fun. It's an on road motorcycle safety course that emphasizes awareness and riding techniques. Groups are small, in our case 6 students and 2 instructors, but I'm pretty sure the biggest the group could have been would be 8 students and 2 instructors.

Saturday morning we assembled in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania and got a preview of the tour. We then divided into groups with an instructor and 3 students and set out for Ohio. We were all equipped with radios but only the instructor transmitted. Initially the instructor lead the ride and demonstrated giving a verbal account of what he was doing and why. Then students rotated into the lead receiving verbal instructions from the leaders. During breaks there were discussions and review sessions including "chalk talks" with the pavement serving as a blackboard.

We spent the evening in the Stockport Mill Inn, an old mill that was converted into an inn. It was very nice and the dinner meal was very good.

Sunday morning was similar but different riding techniques and skills were emphasized. Caldwell, Ohio was the endpoint of the tour and after a wrap-up session we all scattered and headed home. By the way the roads and routes were awesome!

The instructors, Eric and Randy, were excellent and very friendly too boot. All of the participants were good guys, no egos. I found it to be worth every penny and more. I'd recommend the program to anyone. No matter how good your skills are you would benefit from their programs.
My mother asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I said "a biker". She said I'd have to choose one or the other.

Offline Pearl

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2016, 01:07:00 am »
Sounds great.  Never heard of this type of training.  Will look into it.  Will try to see if they have it around my neck of the woods.  Thanks. 
 :002:

Offline Bludy L

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2016, 02:33:54 am »
Check out their website. I think they only do the SE Ohio ride once per year in the spring. But they do a WV and western PA tour that are easily within striking distance for you. They are a bit pricy, but worth every penny. I think I might wait a couple of years and to do the West Virginia tour.
My mother asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I said "a biker". She said I'd have to choose one or the other.

Offline Bludy L

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2016, 03:25:31 pm »
One more thing. Before this training I was often too hot into sharp corners and was very conservative with steering techniques. After some coaching the instructor told me to pick what ever following distance I wanted and then maintain it. He then took off like a bat out of hell. Damn, I didn't know I could ride like that. He must have felt I was up to the challenge or he would never had pushed me like that.

The TTSE handled like a dream!
My mother asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I said "a biker". She said I'd have to choose one or the other.

Offline Coconut

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2016, 08:12:21 pm »
Hi Bludy L -  :047: for taking the Course and sharing the experience  :028:

However ......  :084:

He must have felt I was up to the challenge or he would never had pushed me like that.

That concerns me a little - What if you HADN'T been up to it ?


Offline Bludy L

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2016, 09:20:57 pm »
I think he was a pretty astute instructor.
My mother asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I said "a biker". She said I'd have to choose one or the other.

Offline Shemogolee

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2016, 03:52:56 am »
Hi Guys,

I have two comments.

First, let me congratulate Bludy L for taking this "road course". Ongoing training is one of the most important things a rider can do to keep their safety level high. It's when we think we know it all that bad things start to happen.

In North America 'advanced' training is most often associated with slow speed control skills and higher speed evasive action techniques. Our European cousins tend to concentrate on road training when they take 'advanced' training.  There should not be a disconnect between the two but there certainly is. At present Theory, Slow Speed Skills/Evasive Action Training and Road Training are like three silos in a triangle joined by pathways. They need to be partially overlapping circles where the best level of safety occurs where the circles overlap. This is slowly taking place in North America as evidenced by the course that is referred in previous posts and others like it being offered in different parts of North America. I'm not sure about any change in thought in Europe ... maybe someone could comment.

Now, secondly ... The training I received as a motorcycle instructor and the training I give to the new motorcycles instructors-in-training that I instruct is this. After a good explanation of technique there must be practice, but only to the level that the student is comfortable with. So leading Bludy L through a set of curves at a good pace is a very acceptable training method. After all "like a bat out of hell" is a subjective term   :002:

Bludy L describes his original cornering method as creating a bit of trouble (my words) and after a proper talk about road position for entry, speed for entry, proper head/eye focus and exit technique I have no doubt he could take corners  significantly faster than when he used his previous technique.

best regards,

Shemogolee

Novice/Advance Trainer, Instructor Trainer and Assessor

If you're not disciplined enough to apply your knowledge and skills you're an accident looking for a place to happen

Offline Bludy L

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Re: Stayin' Safe
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2016, 01:28:17 pm »
Of course "bat out of hell" was in reference to my "normal" riding pace. I don't think we ever significantly exceeded the posted speed limit. We were on very twisty, curvy roads where the warning signs suggested an entry speed of 15 to 25 mph. The posted speed limit on the road was 55 mph. As the instructors said "Slow in, out with a grin".

So while very conservative on the entry speeds, we were exiting the curves at a healthy pace. Do things properly on entry, you can roll on during the exit.

It's been almost three weeks since the course and I still constantly "play the motorcycle safety game". Eric and Randy are still "talking to me" as I enter curves and crest blind hills. The course changed the way I ride. One of the biggest revelations was operating at slow speed. Apprehension at slow speeds in parking lots, okay car parks, is all but gone.
My mother asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. I said "a biker". She said I'd have to choose one or the other.

 



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