Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] Topic: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!  (Read 3890 times)

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  • Offline nert   us

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    Offline nert

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    Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    on: Dec 18, 2016, 12.22 am
    Dec 18, 2016, 12.22 am
    Gonna save some money, afterall, I go thru a set of tires every year. I watched a few videos, read instructions, testimonials, should be easy. I purchase a real nice Bike Master wheel balancer. I put a new tire on the front rim....and proceeded with the  balance procedure.  WTF! HOURS, DAYS, WEEKS, and i cant get this thing balanced. AND, I agree with my experience. Its impossible.
    There is no single, one heavy location, and that heavy spot is NOT as wide as a chalk line or piece of tape. The wheel and tire has uncountable number of heavy and light spots. And they're not spots. They can be wedge shaped, or bow tie shaped, in the rotational plane, left to right, combination of all above, and then some. I am SOOOOO frustrated. Blissfully you take your wheel and tire to the bike shop, they charge you lots of money and there are 2 weights, placed neatly in one location. Every front tire I ever had on the Trophy cups and wears "oddly". Countless times I have removed the weights and started over. 30 weights i have on this wheel and it is NOT balanced. Some weights are 180 degrees opposite another weight. Hell, that makes no sense. I placed a weight to balance the weight I put on? But if I remove the balance weight that is counter the balance weight, the results change again. Wheels and tires really cant be balanced, can they? Has any one else had this same experience? Or is it, 1 piece of tape, 2 weights, and your all done? I am loosing my mind..I'm consumed, and consuming..Instead of sheep at night, I see spinning wheels, planets, orbits, gyroscopes, tops, dreidles, circling vultures. HELP...

  • Offline wyso

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    Offline wyso

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #1 on: Dec 18, 2016, 02.02 am
    Dec 18, 2016, 02.02 am
    Its pretty easy to do, must be something you are missing. Maybe find someone who has done a few and have them try you're balancer.

  • Offline Xsv   us

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    Offline Xsv

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #2 on: Dec 18, 2016, 03.33 am
    Dec 18, 2016, 03.33 am
    Your valve stem/TPMS should be your heavy side, assuming your wheel is balanced.  Weights will tend to be opposite to the stem.  I just checked mine and it took 7 1/4 ounces pieces opposite the stem to balance.  However, I must admit I could not find the "yellow dot" when I mounted the tire.

    Check out the article below, seems to be what you are experiencing.  Good luck...persistence :002:

    http://www.tirereview.com/chasing-catching/

  • Offline azccj

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    Offline azccj

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #3 on: Dec 18, 2016, 05.36 am
    Dec 18, 2016, 05.36 am
    I've been balancing my own tires on my bikes for the last 15-20 years and never had any problems.

    First put the tireless wheel along with the mounted TPM sensor, on the balancer's rod and ensure the wheel is centered using the cones. On single sided swing arm wheels a special adapter is sometimes needed to ensure the wheel is centered. Spin the wheel and find the heavy spot and mark it. Spin the wheel again and make sure the heavy spot shows in the same place. Also ensure the wheel is spinning true, as in the rim isn't bent or it's not centered property on the rod/cones causing it to wobble as it spins. Although many people say the heavy spot is always where the tire stem is, it has been my experience more times than not the heavy spot is located in another spot on the rim.

    Some brands of tires are marked with dots, red or yellow. These dots indicate the light spot on the tire. Some tire brands like Michelin don't use dots so where the light spot on the tire is located is going to be unknown. Align the dot or dots with the marked heavy spot on the rim. The idea being to try and minimize the amount of balance weights required to balance the entire wheel/tire assembly. If you are lucky, and it has happened for me a couple of times, no wheel weights will be needed. Put the wheel with tire mounted, onto the balancer then spin the wheel and mark where the heavy spot is, and do it again to make sure. Now place the appropriate amount of wheel weights on the opposite side of the rim from where the heavy spot is marked. This is going to be trial and error until you find the right amount of weight.

    I use some old weights that I've removed during previous tire changes, securing the weights with some duct tape to hold them in place. I then rotate the wheel so the weights are 90 degrees from the bottom then remove my hand from the wheel. When the weights are just right the wheel will not move or move very little. If the wheel still turns and the weights rotate to the bottom then I know I've added too much weight. If  the marked heavy point location for the wheel/tire assembly rotates down, I know I need to add more weight. Once I know how much weight is required, I remove the old weights and duct tape, then install new weights that have good tape backs in the exact location where I had the temporary weights when doing the trial and error.

    When you find the right amount of weight, say four 1/4 oz pieces, place two of the pieces on one side of the rim and two pieces on the other side. If everything is balanced correctly you should be able to turn the wheel 90 degrees at a time on the balancer, remove your hands from the tire and the wheel should not move at all or will stop moving after an inch or 2.
    Last Edit: Dec 18, 2016, 05.40 am by azccj
    Current Bikes
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  • Offline 1675   gb

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    Offline 1675

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #4 on: Dec 18, 2016, 10.08 am
    Dec 18, 2016, 10.08 am
    I've balanced loads of wheels prior to my Triumph, with no problem at all. Are your wheel bearings okay? This may give the effect of "moving" heavy spots.

  • Offline TT Ashford

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    Offline TT Ashford

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #5 on: Mar 01, 2017, 09.26 pm
    Mar 01, 2017, 09.26 pm
    Have been changing my own tyers for years now on road and track bikes, have never balanced a tyer and have never had a problem with it, track bike hits over 180mph with no issues.

  • Offline nert   us

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    Offline nert

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #6 on: Mar 02, 2017, 01.32 am
    Mar 02, 2017, 01.32 am
    Could be just my luck!
    Wheel bearings are perfect. Wheel bearings don't really affect balance state on my balance tool, because wheel bearings rotate "fixed" once locked up on spindle and tapered cones. 
    My final solution, after hours of chasing unbalance, was to break the tire loose from the rim and re-position the tire on the rim repeatedly, until I could get the closest balanced state with out weights. I then, proceed with the "acceptable practiced" balancing instructions. I have accumulated only a couple thousand miles since the tire install in December. (NJ weather, no weekend rides, only commute). High speed performance seems fine, and no signs of cupping, or strange tire wear patterns. I have always had cupping and strange tire wear patterns when original and replacement tires were balanced by dealer. I am hopeful. Miles will tell.

  • Offline Volfy   us

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    Offline Volfy

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    Re: Wheel Balancing Made difficult!!
    Reply #7 on: Mar 02, 2017, 04.20 pm
    Mar 02, 2017, 04.20 pm
    Sounds like you are either:

    1. not centering up the wheel/tire on the balancer nice and tight, and the assembly is shifting on the spindle slightly and throwing off your balancing effort.  I've had this happen occasionally, and had to remount & re-tighten the mounting cones to make sure the wheel is centered as accurately as possible.

    or...

    2. fussing over minute signs of imbalance.  My NoMar balancer is supposedly good for 1/16 Oz., but since the smallest weights I use is 1/4 Oz., that is the limit of my balancing effort.  Occasionally, I do still "see" the wheel still showing somewhat out-of-balance, but to me good enough is good enough.  Most of the wheel/tire sets I've balanced require no more than an Oz or so, so I can see how some riders can do just fine not balancing their wheel/tires.  Personally, I wouldn't ride on road bike wheels without balancing, but neither am I gonna fuss over 1/16 Oz.
    Converto, ergo sum.       '15 300RR, '15 250XCF-W, '14 K1600GT, '12 VFR1200, '05 GSXR600 (track).