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Offline GPL95928

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Gas Octane
« on: June 13, 2013, 02:07:37 am »
Page 70 of the owners handbook says to use 87, page 171 says 91. My dealer said 87 was fine. What are you running?

Offline Saaz

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2013, 03:13:46 am »
Page 70 is  CLC or AKI octane rating (R+M)/2 of 87 (US octane rating). Page 171 is 91 RON (Australia, Europe etc octane rating).  Essentially the same, although from what I have read CLC rating is tested under higher load than the RON rating.

Offline w8d4it

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2013, 03:33:00 am »
Saaz knows of what he speaks! :020:
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Offline GPL95928

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2013, 03:11:00 pm »
Thanks, so what are you guys running here in the USA?

Offline Luckycharms

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 03:58:50 pm »
87
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Offline w8d4it

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2013, 03:59:34 pm »
Because I hadn't bothered to read the manual, at first I ran 93.  Then I read the manual which recommends regular.  I thought to myself "hard to believe a bike with this much power can run on regular.  But then I thought back to my 2011 Thruxton.  That Thruxton ran very badly on premium, stumbling, starting problems, etc.  Then I read the Thruxton manual which recommended regular.  So I switched to regular and it ran beautifully thereafter.  So learning my lesson I've switched to regular on the Trophy and it runs just fine at about 30 cents a gallon less.  I find myself continuing to listen for pinging or detonation but I don't hear it.  Must be Triumph knows what it is doing in recommending regular.
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Offline Trumpetman14

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2013, 04:39:06 pm »
Because higher octane fuel is by design harder to burn, that makes it less likely to diesel, (spontaneously explode due to high compression), so it is more stable in high compression designs. Therefore, higher octane fuel makes an engine w/lower compression burn less efficiently and produces less power and actually subjects the piston, wrist pin, con rod and main bearings to lateral stresses as they try to twist away from the incompletely burned fuel and air mixture during the power stroke. This causes early wear and tear on these critical parts of our engines! Higher octane fuels do not have more power when they burn...it's the higher compression in the engine that effectively hastens the burning fuel and delivers more power...here's an experiment: pour 1/4 cup of 87 into a bucket and 1/4 cup of 93 in another bucket, put a thermometer over each bucket and then toss in a lit match. Both fuels will ignite and burn at the same temperature and will be consumed in the same time frame. Thus demonstrating no particular extra energy or increased combustibility of 93 over 87 octane fuel.  This of course is an over-simplification of the physics of exothermic reactions but suffice to say, still true! Be safe out there, and remember: Don't try this at home!  :182:  -Dr Ron
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 04:42:23 pm by Trumpetman13 »
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Offline Chaos

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Re: Gas Octane
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2013, 05:21:24 pm »
*Originally Posted by Trumpetman13 [+]
Because higher octane fuel is by design harder to burn, that makes it less likely to diesel, (spontaneously explode due to high compression), so it is more stable in high compression designs. Therefore, higher octane fuel makes an engine w/lower compression burn less efficiently and produces less power and actually subjects the piston, wrist pin, con rod and main bearings to lateral stresses as they try to twist away from the incompletely burned fuel and air mixture during the power stroke. This causes early wear and tear on these critical parts of our engines! Higher octane fuels do not have more power when they burn...it's the higher compression in the engine that effectively hastens the burning fuel and delivers more power...here's an experiment: pour 1/4 cup of 87 into a bucket and 1/4 cup of 93 in another bucket, put a thermometer over each bucket and then toss in a lit match. Both fuels will ignite and burn at the same temperature and will be consumed in the same time frame. Thus demonstrating no particular extra energy or increased combustibility of 93 over 87 octane fuel.  This of course is an over-simplification of the physics of exothermic reactions but suffice to say, still true! Be safe out there, and remember: Don't try this at home!  :182:  -Dr Ron

Nice one Ron  :028: Nicely put in layman's terms  :821: :821:

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