Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] Topic: Saddlebag support pad fix  (Read 2878 times)

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  • Offline Hashadenough

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    Offline Hashadenough

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    Saddlebag support pad fix
    on: Jul 19, 2017, 06.11 pm
    Jul 19, 2017, 06.11 pm
    Hey guys,

    Just wanted to pass along a pic or two of a fix I made to protect the saddlebag support pad. The pad contacts the back of the saddlebags and because of road grit, both the pad and the saddlebag get all scraped up! I cut some industrial velcro - just the fuzzy part - and put it on the pads so they won't gouge up the bags.

    By the way, what a difference to ride this bike with no topbox and no bags on it. Wow!

    2017 Trophy SE
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    2004 Ducati ST3, 2011 HD Ultra Limited, 2005 HD Heritage, 2008 HD Street Glide, 2003 HD Road King

  • Offline lemuriano

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    Offline lemuriano

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #1 on: Jul 19, 2017, 06.26 pm
    Jul 19, 2017, 06.26 pm
    This solution is spot on!  :028:
    An apprentice in life, perhaps with the spirit of a Café Racer
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  • Offline Coconut   gb

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    Offline Coconut

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #2 on: Jul 19, 2017, 08.22 pm
    Jul 19, 2017, 08.22 pm
    This was discussed previously, but a long time ago, so I won't drag that Topic back up again.

    A couple of things to watch out for are :

    1.  That the pads used are not too thick , such that they could alter the calibration
    of the "TDLS" system, ( which is set by use of a spacer tool between the arm and the pannier,
    and making adjustments with the threaded part of the link rod under the pillion seat ).

    2.  That the type of pad used doesn't accumulate and absorb dirt and grit into it,
    turning it into a miniature scouring pad and making things worse !

    Personally, I prefer to use a piece of strong tape / vinyl stuck onto the pannier
    where the arm makes contact - This is thin enough not to make any difference to
    the calibration, can be wiped clean whenever the bike is washed, or the pannier removed,
    doesn't absorb any dirt etc, and is easily replaced.

    Cheers  :821:

    Last Edit: Mar 30, 2020, 04.19 pm by Coconut

  • Offline earthman   gb

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    Offline earthman

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #3 on: Jul 19, 2017, 09.03 pm
    Jul 19, 2017, 09.03 pm
    I'm kinda of surprised that Triumph didn't reinforce that section of each pannier with a thin metal plate or sheet of smooth carbon fibre for example. I know that the panniers have a low weight limit, which is easy to exceed when going on a touring/camping trip,......I'm just thinking of the pressure and wear that those small arms are going to do to the rear of the panniers.

  • Offline swannie007

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    Offline swannie007

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #4 on: Jul 20, 2017, 03.40 am
    Jul 20, 2017, 03.40 am
    I like the idea of a small metal plate stuck on the rear of the pannier to mitigate the wear as well as strengthen the contact area on the pannier. I think an approximately 2mm thick piece of stainless steel about 75mm by 75mm should do the trick affixed with some sort of "super" glue. Cheers.

  • Offline earthman   gb

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    Offline earthman

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #5 on: Jul 20, 2017, 08.27 am
    Jul 20, 2017, 08.27 am
    *Originally Posted by swannie007 [+]
    I like the idea of a small metal plate stuck on the rear of the pannier to mitigate the wear as well as strengthen the contact area on the pannier. I think an approximately 2mm thick piece of stainless steel about 75mm by 75mm should do the trick affixed with some sort of "super" glue. Cheers.

    No worries, I've also thought about that area of the panniers in the event of a fall or impact on one of the lids, thinking that the arms might break through.

  • Offline AZBob   us

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    Offline AZBob

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    Re: Saddlebag support pad fix
    Reply #6 on: Jul 21, 2017, 07.35 pm
    Jul 21, 2017, 07.35 pm
    *Originally Posted by earthman [+]
    I'm kinda of surprised that Triumph didn't reinforce that section of each pannier with a thin metal plate or sheet of smooth carbon fibre for example. I know that the panniers have a low weight limit, which is easy to exceed when going on a touring/camping trip,......I'm just thinking of the pressure and wear that those small arms are going to do to the rear of the panniers.

    I'm not sure those little arms see much load. As far as I can tell, the vast majority of the load is handled by the top attachment points. At 10k miles, mine are just slightly scuffed.
    2014 Triumph Trophy 1200 SE
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