Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy  (Read 4022 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

  • Offline ShaunDW

    • Trophy Pro  ‐    213
    • ***
    • Topic Author

    Offline ShaunDW

    • Trophy Pro
    • ***
    • Topic Author
    • Posts: 213
    • Bike: Trophy A1
    • City / Town: Simonstone, Lancs
    Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    on: Jan 31, 2018, 07.34 am
    Jan 31, 2018, 07.34 am
    When I dropped my TT off for its 40K service, I took out a Tiger 1200 XRt for the day. Here are my thoughts:

    First the bad stuff – the mirror image was rather blurred, not like the clear image in my Trophy mirrors. It was like being back on an 80s era bike. Also, there was a lot of noise (kind of a roar) coming from the front, that I couldn’t quite pinpoint. It didn’t change when freewheeling down a hill with the clutch in, so not the engine. It didn’t change when the front brakes were applied, so nothing to do with the brakes. And it didn’t change with the road surface. The only thing I can think of is a grumbling wheel bearing (on a new bike?). Above about 60mph it wasn’t really noticeable above the wind noise (I didn’t wear ear plugs on this trip), but for back road cruising and through towns and villages I found it quite annoying. I asked the dealer to check it out and if they found anything to let me know.

    The main reason for my test, was to check out the updates from the old Tiger Explorer that could potentially have been included on the Trophy. So, the engine has been “improved” and yes, it did feel a little more eager, but I noticed that the gearing is different to the Trophy, revving higher than I was used to for a certain speed. And the bike I rode had an Arrow silencer for better looks, weight & sound. So I couldn’t really report that there is a big improvement in the engine, it felt very similar really allowing for the gearing. It did only manage 45mpg (British gallons) while I had it, which included a fair bit of “pottering”. My Trophy would be returning high 50’s over similar conditions, so I found the fuel consumption quite disappointing. My test bike also had a quick-shifter and try as I might I struggled to upset it. When I say try, that would just be my ham-fisted approach to using it after decades of using a traditional clutch! Only occasionally did a gear change “lurch”. Most were very smooth, both up and down shifts – I was mightily impressed!

    The colour instrument screen was a big improvement, and I rather liked the display options available. Some of the icons were maybe a bit small (such as the heated grips icon – and in particular the dots underneath that indicated the heat setting), but they also changed colour to indicate their state. I liked the way that the display contrast inverted automatically when passing through areas of deep shadow. The menu was accessed through a thumb operated joystick on the left hand switch cluster. Up and down to change the option displayed on the bottom of the screen, and left and right to adjust. I forgot to try the different engine modes and stayed in “Road” the whole day, but the suspension adjustment is available through this method as is the electric screen adjustment. The cruise control has now moved to the left, and subsequently is easier to engage, and it seemed that the throttle required a slightly more positive “roll-back” action to disengage than my Trophy. This should hopefully eliminate the occasional accidental disengagement that I suffer from as a result of bumps in the road!

    The LED headlights looked very bright, and it seemed they could be switched off, leaving just the DRLs that separate the top & bottom halves of the lights, but as it was a beautiful sunny day I can’t confirm how bright they would be at night. My bike was fitted with the auxiliary lights as well, which were selectable from the left hand cluster. I also can’t report how effective the back-lit switch clusters were in the dark due to the bright sunshine throughout my ride.

    The keyless ignition worked as advertised, and the steering lock was also electronic and activated from a button on the right hand bar. A bit weirdly, the bike had to be “turned on” via the kill switch (which was a rocker) and then started by rocking that switch the other way (down). I am trying to remember now what the button that occupied the traditional starter button position did? Maybe it was the driving mode that I didn’t adjust?

    Finally my Tiger 1200 test bike had “hill hold assist”, which I erroneously thought was a “hill start assist” to begin with. But it can only activate when in neutral, so is of no use when pulling away. I never quite got the hang of engaging it either. Sometimes I managed it, sometimes I couldn’t. On those rare occasions when one might be stuck in traffic for a while on a hill, I can see that it would be useful, but I doubt it would see much use with the average rider.

    I also felt that the riding position of the Tiger was better than my Trophy, with the bars being slightly higher and further forward (I never looked at adjusting the seat height, and I have my Trophy seat on the low setting). The bike also felt remarkably light compared to my Trophy. The protection offered by the bodywork and screen was better than I expected. I could feel some buffeting to my shoulders and the sides of my torso behind the narrow screen, but my head was unaffected and it seems would be equally as well shielded from the elements as on my Trophy. The range of movement of the electric screen was not as great as on the Trophy, and I would expect that a touring version would be available that would be a bit wider and probably offer nearly as good protection as the Trophy. I did notice that my lower legs (from the knee down) were more exposed, and this was reflected in the additional dirt that had been flung up from the road to coat the shins of my trousers and boots.

    Of all of the improvements that Triumph have made to the Tiger 1200 there are a number that I think would have been beneficial on the Trophy. Obviously, it never hurts to uprate the engine output a bit, and I would love to have a colour instrument screen and LED headlights. The cruise operation is better on the left, and having back-lit switches would help navigate the, now rather cluttered, switch cluster. I’m rather ambivalent about the keyless ignition, and hill hold assist, but would love to see the quick shifter on the Trophy!
    Pacific Blue Trophy A1
    Honda Bros 650 (since import from Japan in '95)
    History (best of):
    KE125, CB250T, DT400, GS425, GS650G, XR200, CB900F2, FJ1200, K1200RS

  • Offline Stelyn   gb

    • Trophy Master  ‐    931
    • ****
      #1

    Offline Stelyn

    • Trophy Master
    • ****
    • Posts: 931
    • Bike: 2014 Trophy SE
    • City / Town: Ashford, Kent.
    • Country: gb
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #1 on: Jan 31, 2018, 08.22 am
    Jan 31, 2018, 08.22 am
      Interesting post Shaun  :028:,  thanks for sharing..... :821:

    `Only a Motorcyclist  knows why a dog rides with his head out of the car window '

  • Offline tdragger   us

    • Trophy Master  ‐    613
    • ****
      #2

    Offline tdragger

    • Trophy Master
    • ****
    • Posts: 613
    • Bike: 2015 Trophy SE
    • City / Town: Fredericksburg
    • Country: us
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #2 on: Jan 31, 2018, 12.38 pm
    Jan 31, 2018, 12.38 pm
    Thanks for sharing.  I'm hoping to look at the new 1200 next week.
    -------------------------------------
    15 Triumph Trophy SE (2019 Iron Butt Rally, 2022 LDX Rally)
    16 Triumph Trophy SE (2021 Iron Butt Rally)
    IBA #609

  • Offline GaryWWhite   us

    • Trophy Master  ‐    535
    • ****
      #3

    Offline GaryWWhite

    • Trophy Master
    • ****
    • Posts: 535
    • Bike: 2017 TTSE Black
    • City / Town: Lees Summit Missouri
    • Country: us
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #3 on: Jan 31, 2018, 03.44 pm
    Jan 31, 2018, 03.44 pm
     :460: Thanks for sharing!  :020:

  • Offline silverstripes   gb

    • Trophy Master  ‐    1071
    • ****
      #4

    Offline silverstripes

    • Trophy Master
    • ****
    • Posts: 1071
    • Bike: Trophy
    • City / Town: Chudleigh, Devon, UK
    • Country: gb
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #4 on: Jan 31, 2018, 07.35 pm
    Jan 31, 2018, 07.35 pm
    Hi Shaun

    Good comparison thanks for posting  :047:
    It wasn't me !!

  • Online trophied   us

    • Trophy God  ‐    5110
    • *****
      #5

    Online trophied

    • Trophy God
    • *****
    • Posts: 5110
    • Bike: 2013 Trophy SE
    • City / Town: New Braunfels, Tx
    • Country: us
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #5 on: Jan 31, 2018, 10.45 pm
    Jan 31, 2018, 10.45 pm
    How well did the suspension work for you, and did you adjusts any of its settings?
    One of the Founding Members of the Twisted Trophies

  • Offline ShaunDW

    • Trophy Pro  ‐    213
    • ***
    • Topic Author
    • #6

    Offline ShaunDW

    • Trophy Pro
    • ***
    • Topic Author
    • Posts: 213
    • Bike: Trophy A1
    • City / Town: Simonstone, Lancs
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #6 on: Feb 01, 2018, 07.31 am
    Feb 01, 2018, 07.31 am
    *Originally Posted by trophied [+]
    How well did the suspension work for you, and did you adjusts any of its settings?

    Yes, I tried out the suspensions settings through the full range, but only in the Road mode (I gather changing driving mode also changes some of the suspension settings?). Also, bear in mind that I have the standard TT, and hence do not often adjust the suspension at all so cannot make a comparison in this respect. But suffice it to say, that in "comfort" mode, the bike was very comfortable, and would absorb big potholes with aplomb, but would wallow a bit if the bump was encountered while cornering. In "sport" mode it was much less forgiving but felt better accelerating hard out of bends. Adjustment can only be made while stationary, but is easy to do through the thumb joystick and screen menu etc. There were about 9 graduations across the scale from comfort to sport, and I ended up on about 3.
    Pacific Blue Trophy A1
    Honda Bros 650 (since import from Japan in '95)
    History (best of):
    KE125, CB250T, DT400, GS425, GS650G, XR200, CB900F2, FJ1200, K1200RS

  • Online trophied   us

    • Trophy God  ‐    5110
    • *****
      #7

    Online trophied

    • Trophy God
    • *****
    • Posts: 5110
    • Bike: 2013 Trophy SE
    • City / Town: New Braunfels, Tx
    • Country: us
    Re: Updates to the Tiger 1200 that should have made it onto the Trophy
    Reply #7 on: Feb 01, 2018, 03.18 pm
    Feb 01, 2018, 03.18 pm
    Sounds like "Comfort" mode would be about the same then, I find that the Trophy set that way also wallows a little in curves with uneven paving.  I was wondering how the longer travel suspension would soak up irregularities.  The people that I know that ride R1200GS' think they ride really well.  Thanks for all the info.
    One of the Founding Members of the Twisted Trophies

     



    tweedy-bunch