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Offline earthman

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2018, 10:15:58 PM »
*Originally Posted by silverstripes [+]
Paul

I have experienced a little brake dragging in the past.

Now about every 5k miles I remove the pads and wash out the calipers with bike cleaner (Muck Off) and then brake cleaner and an old toothbrush, washing out the calipers with a spray bottle. You will be amazed with the crap that comes out.

Bottom line is this brake dust and road dirt stops the pads from moving, thus inducing some dragging or binding.

I then rebuild with the same pads if they are ok wear wise, in the same position in the same caliper.

The difference in the bike free running is amazing and braking much improved.

Works for me  :028:

When you reassemble, are you using a dab of copper slip or something else maybe?

Offline silverstripes

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2018, 10:21:49 PM »
Earthman

I used to use copper slip. However I found that this attracted the brake dust turning into a goey past of copprslip and brake dust and adding to the problem.

Last time and 3 weeks back built them up dry and all seems well.  :169:
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Offline earthman

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2018, 10:26:11 PM »
*Originally Posted by silverstripes [+]
Earthman

I used to use copper slip. However I found that this attracted the brake dust turning into a goey past of copprslip and brake dust and adding to the problem.

Last time and 3 weeks back built them up dry and all seems well.  :169:

I know that that Edd China is now saying not to use it.

Offline AZBob

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2018, 06:24:57 PM »
*Originally Posted by earthman [+]
I know that that Edd China is now saying not to use it.

Edd China is great. Before him, however, I've never used the stuff in 20 years of brake changes, and never had a single problem.
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Offline earthman

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2018, 06:00:54 PM »
I've just seen that the workshop manual states not to use a mineral based grease or copper based one in any area where contact with hydraulic & dust seals may occur because these may damage these seals. :005:

It does say to lubricate the pad retaining pin using a minimum amount of proprietary high temperature copper based grease though. :008: 

They also mention lubricating the caliper mounting bracket pins with a silicone base grease such as T2022021 which should be available via a Triumph dealer I guess. 

Offline Hooka74

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2018, 01:25:49 PM »
I had  a similar problem with mine (2012 on 13 plate) . While I had a mate of mine doing the 20000 service he stripped the rear master cylinder and found that the rubber was perished and the spring was stuck firmly.

I got some new parts (8/9/10/11) http://www.worldoftriumph.com/triumph_motorcycle_parts_locator?block_02=100061478-1-2&block_03=621910)
  from Triumph and he fitted them. However, he then had problems with bleeding them. He was advised that it had to be done by Triumph, for £85,  as he didn't have dealer tool. When they had it in they said that there was a problem with bleeding the brakes. Triumph Mechanic said that the master cylinder had been put back together incorrectly and couldn't bleed the brakes. They had to strip it down and reassemble it. (Total price £147)

Now my question is....

Can you put the master cylinder together the wrong way. Especially if you've had 40 odd years of experience with all types of bikes and not a mere amateur?   My belief is that Triumph have done something wrong and trying to blame my mate. This based on my belief that one of the mechanics is a lot of the time a billy bullsh#t!

I would be interested in your views.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2018, 01:29:52 PM by Hooka74 »
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Offline ShaunDW

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2018, 09:18:53 AM »
*Originally Posted by earthman [+]
When you reassemble, are you using a dab of copper slip or something else maybe?
About a year ago I fitted new (EBC H/H) pads using copper grease on all sliding surfaces, on the rear of the pads, and on the pins. A few months later I had a new right-hand calliper fitted under warranty. Then in January I pulled all the pads out to give everything a thorough clean for similar reasons to Silverstripes and because the new calliper was replaced due to corrosion eating away the locating lugs separating the pads, so I wanted to check for the start of any more. The pads in the new calliper were replaced with Triumph ones when it was fitted and had been installed without any grease of any sort (I since confirmed this with the mechanic). They showed noticeable signs of uneven wear on opposing sides, were stiff to remove and one even had to be prised out with a screwdriver it was that seized in place. Needless to say, that was the pad with the most material left on it! In contrast, the pads in the other calliper all came out with no drama. Yes there was a build up of gunge where brake dust and dirt adhered to the grease, but the pad wear was even and they all slid out easily.

I concede the possibility that the OEM pads may be a tighter fit than the EBC pads, but not to the extent I encountered that encourages uneven wear. So I believe this experience reinforces my use of copper grease on all sliding contact points when installing the brake pads. Especially when riding all year round on the salt encrusted roads that we have in the UK at the moment.

In order to retain optimal braking on the TT when riding all year round and in all weathers, it is good practice to remove the brake pads about twice a year and give everything a good clean out and re-assemble with a smear of copper grease on all rubbing/sliding surfaces.
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Offline gfxmonkey

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Re: Binding Brakes
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2018, 01:21:37 PM »
I'd say it was due to the road conditions, salt mainly. I have the same problem if its not used regularly on the road. Remember to hose it done after a salty run. Should clear itself after a few miles. The thing is use a rubber mallet on the calipers, I know what some will say but it does work to free up the pistons in there.

 


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