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Author [ES] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [SE] [FI] [NO] Topic: Rain proof? No it isn't  (Read 1228 times)

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Offline janfmiller

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2018, 04:57:35 PM »
For many years My rain gear was an inexpensive Jacket I bought At a Canadian Tire store And Coleman rain pants.  I would replace the rain pants Every year as they were The part that would start leaking but they were inexpensive . As I posted earlier now I have first gear Jacket and pants And they are still water tight after 3 or 4 years
1977 Suzuki TS-185
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Offline Jubeeprince

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2018, 05:01:56 AM »
I've used cheap (Frogg Toggs), not so cheap (Triumph brand) and expensive (Olympia). Guess which one kept me dry? Olympia. Not inexpensive, but what price to be dry and comfortable? I have the Airglide pants and Dakar 2 jacket. Both have removable waterproof layer that can be worn outside or inside the jacket and pants. I have worn them on the outside numerous times, (they make for a good windbreak when worn on the inside when it's dry). One time last year I rode in an absolute downpour. I mean, it rained. Hard. Biblical proportions. Rode for over three hours on highway in the deluge and I stayed dry. (Rukka Gore-Tex gloves and Alpinestar Gore-Tex boots).

It was a lot of money (~1000.00 USD for jacket, pants, gloves and boots), but arriving at your destination dry? Priceless.

Cheers,

Steve

Offline Emerson

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2018, 07:09:18 AM »
I rode out to an outlet mall and found a Mountain Warehouse store. They had some hi-viz raingear that seems to be of good quality (time will tell). The best part for me was they had XXL and XXXL, the latter which fit over my three season size (US) 50L Tourmaster comfortably. Together they were under $100 dollars.Very pleased with the construction of the jacket and pants, and the fit is outstanding.  It is available in several  hi viz colors as well as black. Advertised as a windcutter-breaker as well. I haven't been out in a good soaking yet but excellent in the light shower and several light rain incidents. The Tourmaster was advertised as waterproof and I've found that claim to be dubious, but with the extra layer it seems  :062:
« Last Edit: October 29, 2018, 07:23:42 AM by Emerson »
“In the end, today is forever, yesterday is still today, and tomorrow is already today.”

Offline Mongoose

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2018, 08:31:18 AM »
I've never found a truly waterproof jacket, so wear an over jacket and flouro cheap plastic over trouser that cost me £8. Dry every time, even when the rain has been biblical. Added bonus is that according to my mate, the hi viz is VERY hi viz.
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Offline Phil

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2018, 08:52:12 AM »
jaapvanthoff,

I've never washed my ear in a washing machine.   I usually wear a base layer and wash that.  Somehow, the main riding gear never seems to get that dirty.   apart from which, the "washing machine is her department.  I wouldn't know how to operate it.   

Phil

 

Offline GarminDave

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2018, 12:49:55 PM »
Good thread Phil.

I too 'work' using the bike and have to spend 12 hours in torrential rain sometimes and doing about 20,000 miles a year need gear that works.  I understand some can't justify the cost with gear that actually works and a reasonable solution is to have a boil in the bag over suit, like Frogg Togs.  It's worth remembering that all things are waterproof, even a paper bag, but not for long!

I used Aerostich Roadcrafter for many years, currently using my third, but although waterproof on a very wet day I felt wet as the material absorbed the wet.  I now have KLIM, which has a top membrane that actually runs the water off and so far never felt wet or got wet.

I looked at Rukka and Halverson but decided on KLIM because it has fantastic vents so this summer whilst in Prague it was 38C and I still managed to function with all the gear on.  My colleague on this trip relied on a leather suit with a waterproof oversuit but managed to get his leathers wet once, too slow putting on the oversuit, and had damp leathers for the next couple of days!

The other feature I like, which I don't ever hope to try, is the crash protection KLIM offer.

Finally KLIM will replace your kit within five years of purchase if you return it for inspection after an off.  I know Rukka also have a bullet proof warranty even loaning you kit whilst your problems are sorted but did not go with Rukka as apparently they are no very good in hot climates.

I also think using Triumph or BMW gear you pay for the branding and get lower quality than the money deserves as Triumph and BMW (or any other non manufacturing supplier) need their cut.


So as Ruskin says:  "It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When
you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay
too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you
bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The
common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a
lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well
to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will
have enough to pay for something better."

Love, light, and kindness,

Dave
2016 TTSE

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Re: Rain proof? No it isn't
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2018, 12:59:43 PM »
*Originally Posted by GarminDave [+]
Good thread Phil.

I too 'work' using the bike and have to spend 12 hours in torrential rain sometimes and doing about 20,000 miles a year need gear that works.  I understand some can't justify the cost with gear that actually works and a reasonable solution is to have a boil in the bag over suit, like Frogg Togs.  It's worth remembering that all things are waterproof, even a paper bag, but not for long!

I used Aerostich Roadcrafter for many years, currently using my third, but although waterproof on a very wet day I felt wet as the material absorbed the wet.  I now have KLIM, which has a top membrane that actually runs the water off and so far never felt wet or got wet.

I looked at Rukka and Halverson but decided on KLIM because it has fantastic vents so this summer whilst in Prague it was 38C and I still managed to function with all the gear on.  My colleague on this trip relied on a leather suit with a waterproof oversuit but managed to get his leathers wet once, too slow putting on the oversuit, and had damp leathers for the next couple of days!

The other feature I like, which I don't ever hope to try, is the crash protection KLIM offer.

Finally KLIM will replace your kit within five years of purchase if you return it for inspection after an off.  I know Rukka also have a bullet proof warranty even loaning you kit whilst your problems are sorted but did not go with Rukka as apparently they are no very good in hot climates.

I also think using Triumph or BMW gear you pay for the branding and get lower quality than the money deserves as Triumph and BMW (or any other non manufacturing supplier) need their cut.


So as Ruskin says:  "It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When
you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay
too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you
bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The
common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a
lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well
to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will
have enough to pay for something better."

Love, light, and kindness,

Dave

Well put Dave. :821:
One of the Founding Members of the Twisted Trophies