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Offline RocketSteve

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2019, 05:16:35 PM »
There's a chunky heavy duty circlip that I removed to take the photo Steve, a bit difficult to see it but there is a recess there for the clip.
The circlip moves freely within the recess using clip pliers so it's not actually securing or retaining the hub, probably just secondary security.
I don't have a puller so I've put it all back together now.
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Online earthman

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2019, 09:55:24 PM »
Thanks Steve, for confirming that there is secondary something in place there, for a moment I thought that may not have been the case. :005:

 

Offline 1675

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #10 on: April 27, 2019, 08:04:28 AM »
I reckon the circlip is a secondary method to holding the hub on, the primary method would seem to be an interference fit between the shaft and hub (where the male is larger than the female). Possibly assembled as a "shrink" fit where the outer is heated to expand it, or a very heavy press. I don't think a 3 legged puller would remove this, but I've never had one apart so just making my assumptions on what would be good engineering practice.

Online earthman

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2019, 03:59:32 PM »
*Originally Posted by 1675 [+]
I reckon the circlip is a secondary method to holding the hub on, the primary method would seem to be an interference fit between the shaft and hub (where the male is larger than the female). Possibly assembled as a "shrink" fit where the outer is heated to expand it, or a very heavy press. I don't think a 3 legged puller would remove this, but I've never had one apart so just making my assumptions on what would be good engineering practice.

I have the same feeling, my guess is that you are spot on and hence why Triumph say that the whole unit should be replaced rather than stripped/repaired.

I don't like the idea of this shrink fit arrangement, anyone know if other shaft drive bikes have followed suit??

Offline 1675

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2019, 12:11:04 AM »
Shrink fit is fine, if properly machined. Think of the starter ring gears on car/large diesel engine flywheels which always used to be replaceable by heating the new one up and dropping it on to the cold flywheel. They never moved or slipped.

Online earthman

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2019, 09:08:11 AM »
I guess you/Triumph are right,..it just seemed a bit dodgy to me especially considering all the weight/forces involved in this application.

Would you attempt to take it apart to replace that bearing?
Just wondering what the chances of an home gamer doing this and the outcome being successful??
I have an hydraulic press and heat source but wouldn't want to try it myself,..removal I'm fine with, it's the refitting and staying put that worries me.

Offline 1675

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2019, 10:09:28 AM »
Now this is only a guess based on engineering experience and previously working in the manufacture of large driving heads (diffs) for trucks.
I reckon the 2 bearings giving trouble will be taper rollers with a spacer between them. Their housings (outer races) will be in the bevel housing plate which is removeable judging by the radial bolts and the spacer required will be selected from several to give the correct pre load. Not too tight, not too slack. There will also be an oil seal here, likely the "non serviceable one", which wont be accessible once it is all pressed together. Once the correct spacer is selected, the whole assembly of housing plate will have the crown wheel and bearing, spacer and second bearing assembled into it, then the splined boss with the 5 wheel studs will be pressed on to the splined crown wheel shaft. This sub assembly will then be assemble into the bevel box housing with shims being used between the 2 to get the correct mesh depth and tooth contact pattern, which will be adjusted with the use of different spacers and adjustment of the pinion in and out.
All in all, quite a complicated assembly which will require special tools and knowledge, but don't forget, I'm only guessing!!

Online earthman

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Re: Rear Wheel Bearing.
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2019, 11:36:00 AM »
If say an old unit happen to be sent your way for free, would you be up for stripping it/posting pictures, assuming that you have the equipment needed to do it?

I'd love to know how it's put together too, going by your background, you sound like the best person on here to get into one.

Probably be a few more years until these units will surface in the breakers etc, although if the Explorer model continues (with the same drive unit) then maybe looking into repair/reconditioning these units could be something to get into??

 



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