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Offline JerseyJeff

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Gear shift mounting bolt
« on: May 17, 2019, 05:07:24 AM »
Anyone have any issues or info about how to remove the shouldered bolt that holds the gear shifter on?
I'm on the road and had a spill that broke the bolt. I've tried to drill and tap the bolt out, but it's not cooperating.
Any help or advise would be greatly appreciated. I know Coconut has offered much advise here, so I'm hoping someone has done or read about the replacing of this f*&#@in thing !!!

Offline Coconut

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 07:38:34 AM »
Hi JerseyJeff,

Sorry to hear of this - have you got the Trophy back home ?

A lot will depend on your skills and available equipment.

The Gear Lever Pivot bolt is a softer metal than than the material of the frame into which it is bolted,
but when assembled a Thread Locking compound is used, which, together with the effects of
dissimilar materials being in prolonged contact, can make the bond very tight.

Although some Members have got away with it, I wouldn't recommend trying to use a Hand held drill,
as there is the risk of wandering off centre and damaging the threaded hole of the frame,
which would then need "Heli-Coiling".

Forum Member 1675 made a Jig that bolts to the Frame
and facilitates accurate centralised drilling to remove the sheared off bolt.

He has offered to lend the Jig to any Forum Member, but he is in the UK,
so Postage costs and time might be a limiting factor, but it is worth considering.

There's a lot of information in this Topic : Guide for Gear Lever Strop Down.

Other Members have advocated the use of localised heating with a suitable controllable gas Torch,
to melt away the Thread Locking compound and break the seal, but again this is dependant
on knowing what you're doing, to avoid causing further damage.

You didn't say how old your Trophy is - I'm guessing it's out of Warranty
or you'd be asking Triumph to sort this out, but you could still  try enquiring with your nearest
Triumph Dealer ( appreciating that in the U.S. this may be a considerable distance away ),
and if they are unable to help, they may be able to recommend a specialised engineering companiy
that might be able to help, closer to where you live.

Cheers  :821:




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Online earthman

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 09:32:10 AM »
Good luck Jeff, I made something that you could fit at the side of the road that would have you up and running in 10 minutes. If you are handy at making stuff out of metal then feel free to copy my design, I posted pictures on one of the threads.


Offline JerseyJeff

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 03:22:18 PM »
Thanks for the replies.
My friend is actually a car tech, and has years of experience with wrenching. Fortunately, we pushed the linkage into 2nd gear and limped to the hotel we were staying at, 20 miles away.
The maintenance guy there happened to be friendly and kind enough to help us out with some tools, lights, drill and bits, and even a tap set. We worked the old bolt out, but need up needing to get a Help-coil. It seems things are going to we are going to have continued luck, and will be able to continue on with our road trip from here.
It seems that a different set up, such as a threaded stud that you could unbolt and slide the shift lever off, would be a better idea, but I'm no bike designer/engineer !!
Thanks again for the advise, this forum is a great place and community for Trophy riders.

Offline bobv07662

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2019, 02:08:47 AM »
Jersey Jeff,  I don't know your time requirements but I have the metric helicoil kit you need, the bad news is that I'm away on a road trip myself. Let me know if next week is soon enough as I won't be home till Monday.
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Online dietDrThunder

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2019, 12:09:59 AM »

Offline BTB

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Re: Gear shift mounting bolt
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2019, 08:58:46 AM »
When mine went I popped into a local B&Q, picked up a long thick coach bolt and a couple of nuts and washers.  Fitted this as a temporary measure nut either side of the bolt entry point so as to ensure the bolt stayed locked tight) to drive home and it worked perfectly well. Then took it a few days later to the local bike who tapped the original part and refitted it with a bolt and washer. He had the proper gear as he does engineering work too. He also put some hardening compound in there too. It’s now solid and for me far stronger than whatever riveting system Triumph used. I appreciate that the drilling etc is hard to do and would need the right equipment to get it right. This could be done by any engineering place though and then fitted yourself. I now keep the bolt I used on the bike just in case. It could be used on any bike as a temporary measure. I had the (mis)fortune to have had it happen to me but I was within walking distance of a B&Q so it wasn’t that bad and I used my head to sort it out. Unfortunately it’s not always as simple as that

 



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